THEARC Farm & Bridge Park Plots

Building Bridges to Healthy Food Access

BBAR is developing a fresh, healthy and local food network to increase food access with more nutritious options. Our food centric cooperative of eight local urban farms, gardens and kitchen networks grow and distribute organic fruits, vegetables, and herbs and meal options to families in a community with only one full service grocery store serving over 85,000 residents.

THEARC Farm, EST. Spring 2013 | Building Bridges Across the River (BBAR), 1901 Mississippi Ave SE, Washington, DC  | The Town Hall Education, Arts, and Recreation Center (THEARC) Farm is the largest in the network with half an acre for production. This Farm serves as the production and educational site to provide opportunities, tours, and food distribution through our Community Supported Agriculture or CSA. The farm seeks to expand by an acre in order to incorporate a permaculture food forest that will increase the ecological diversity of the farm.

 

Ujima Urban Farm, EST. Spring 2016 | Union Temple Baptist Church,  1225 W St SE, Washington, DC  |  Ujima is a Swahili word meaning communalism. The Ujima Farm is the largest Bridge Park Plot with more than 90 raised beds accompanied by 12 fruits trees. The Ujima Farm seeks to be a production food hub site that hosts weekly farmers markets and educational programs center around healthy food access. ujima being a Swahili word meaning communalism. Find out more about Ujima Urban here. 

 

Baby Bloomer’s Farm & Orchard, EST. Summer 2017 | The National Children’s Center, 3400 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC | An Early Learning Center serving children under five is where our second largest plot in the Bridge Park network with 65 beds and 18 fruit trees. The farm works to combat food insecurity for families with young children. NCC chefs prepare food grown from the farm for children, teacher, and parents. NCC staff educates its students and parents through educational programming and cooking classes.

 

Hopkins Farm, EST. Spring 2018 | Hopkins Housing Complex, 1430 L St SE, Washington, DC | This is our newest Bridge Park Plot and is the third largest in size with 45 beds and 25 fruit trees. During year one, the Bridge Park Plots engage residents on site to develop a unique name that represents their vision of the space, what they seek to grow, and how. This site can be used as a model for other public housing units seeking to address food insecurity.

 

Garden of Grace, EST. Spring 2016 | Bethel Christian Fellowship, 2220  Martin  Luther  King  Jr.  Ave  SE,  Washington,  DC | The site is a charming garden plot and is our smallest site with 11 beds and a 220 foot green wall. Grace  acts as an educational resource on healthy eating for the children who attend early learning center at this site. In addition, the gardeners at BCF share their produce with congregants through their pop-up food market and church-related events.

 

Garden of Eden, EST. Summer 2017 | Allen Chapel AME Church, 2498  Alabama  Ave  SE,  Washington,  DC  |  This site is comprised of nine raised beds and 16 fruit trees. This garden, whose namesake is inspired by the Biblical story of Adam and Eve, strives to embody paradise as described in the Bible. The gardeners of Eden are growing flowers, fruits and vegetables, but what makes this plot unique is its herbs and medicinal plants being grow to address chronic illness and disease in the community.

 

Barrack’s Grows Garden, EST. 2016 | National Community Church, 535 8th St SE, Washington, DC | This site is our first Bridge Park Plot in Ward 6. This urban garden plot is located in the historic Barracks Row neighborhood. The National Community Church partnered with Cultivate the City, to install vertical tower gardens of herbs and other edible crops. Food grown at this site is distributed as part of a school based Community Supported Agriculture or CSA.

 

Garden of Hope, EST. 2016 | Wayne Place Residents,  165 Mississippi Avenue, SE,  Washington,  DC  | This site is comprised of 16 raised beds and 4 fruit trees. The site is operated by DC Child and Family Services who seek to  assist  youth transitioning out of the foster system. Wayne Place works to provide these youths with entrepreneurship and employment training in the urban agriculture industry. By doing this, pathways to a hopeful and productive future are created.